Tag Archives: Renovating

A Tale Of Termites

A Tale of Termites

Termites are very destructive, and the outside appearance of wood doesn’t necessarily indicate what’s going on inside.

Not long ago, a very nice listing of ours went under contract. During inspections, evidence of termites was discovered in several rooms of the home. The inspector seemed to think that the termites had been in the house for quite some time, due to how far they had spread. After hearing this, we were very fearful of what damage they may have done. In this series of posts we are going to show how they were discovered, the extent of the damage, and what the final outcome was.

termite1

This picture shows a baseboard in one room of the house. At first glance, it appears normal, but if you look closely, you can see faint lines in the wood. A couple of those lines have dark spots or cracks in them. One can easily be fooled into thinking this is just the grain of the wood, but these actually indicate the presence of termites. Continue reading

Town Hall Meeting on Flood Recovery 9/13/2016

Town Hall Meeting on Flood Recovery 9/13/2016

Notes and comments on the meeting

I attended this meeting last night, which was held at our beautiful Live Oak United Methodist Church. Those present included State Representative Valarie Hodges, Livingston Parish President Layton Ricks, Livingston Flood Administrator Chuck Vincent, several representatives of FEMA, SBA, the governor’s office, GOHSEP, and others.

Below is a summary of the notes I took during the meeting, along with my comments in italics.

Continue reading

After the 2016 Flood: What to Expect in Real Estate and Beyond

After the 2016 Flood: What to Expect in Real Estate and Beyond

Answers to important unresolved issues may change this, but as of now, here are our broad views on what lies ahead.

We broke down residential properties into 3 general categories, and offer our thoughts on issues related to each:

1. Homes which were untouched by the flood
As detailed in our previous article, we believe that prices for these homes should rise modestly (10-15%) over the next year. This is due to the simple law of supply and demand. Among these houses, those in so-called “no flood” zones (zones X, C, or B; properly called “moderate to low risk areas”) should be the most sought after. (Click here for a more complete explanation of flood zones.)

Undamaged houses in “flood zones” (zones A, AE, or V; properly called Special Flood Hazard Areas / SFHAs) will still be in demand, but because of their flood zone classification, they’re not quite as attractive.

2. Homes which received minimal flooding, and have never flooded before
These houses should still be very marketable after PROPER repair, especially those not in an SFHA. Sellers will have to disclose the fact that it flooded, of course. Homes such as these will take some time to repair, and once complete, probably won’t fetch quite as much as undamaged homes. However, they will have considerable value, since there are a limited number of homes which were completely untouched. It’s possible that bargains may be found among these once-flooded houses, if the owners decide to sell them as-is and move instead of repairing them.

3. Homes which received a significant amount of flood damage
Houses in this category have many potential issues to examine. Local governments are requiring inspections before issuing building permits. Also, higher water levels mean more damage, thus the “substantial repair” rules are more likely to apply. “Substantial repair” is a repair costing at least 50% of the property’s market value. FEMA mandates that properties requiring substantial repair must also be brought into compliance with current NFIP (National Flood Insurance Program) guidelines. In other words, if a house is below BFE (Base Flood Elevation) and “substantially damaged” then it must be elevated at least to the BFE in order to be compliant. Ascension and East Baton Rouge Parishes have even stricter requirements with regard to “substantial repair”. Ascension normally requires elevation to 1’ above the highest water level during a flood, and East Baton Rouge considers 40% to be the threshold for “substantial repair”. However, as of now, Ascension has relaxed their elevation requirement to 1’ above BFE, which is still tougher than FEMA’s standards.

Houses such as these will need a lot of work. If the owner had flood insurance, then they SHOULD receive sufficient funds to repair it, unless elevating is required. Flood policies include up to $30K of ICC (Increased Cost of Compliance) coverage to help elevate, but that might only pay to raise a small house on piers, and not much else. Mandated elevation is the number one concern on everyone’s mind right now! If a house needs “substantial repair” and lies below BFE, then the cost of elevation must be added to the already large repair cost. Even with flood insurance, the total is likely to be out of reach for many homeowners. People are justifiably upset about this. Some are talking about simply walking away from their homes, as they have no way to pay for everything.

If communities are left with thousands of houses which are deemed both non-compliant and substantially damaged, and whose owners cannot afford to elevate them, it will be a disaster. The houses would stand empty, meaning we could be faced with entire neighborhoods of abandoned homes.

On a positive note, it is likely that there will be opportunities among houses with considerable damage. Some owners will want to simply get rid of their damaged homes quickly, and sell them at bargain prices. This would allow those willing to invest the money, time, and effort to acquire a house inexpensively. Doing so would benefit new homeowners, property flippers, or those wanting to use the house for rental income, thus bringing new life to these homes and neighborhoods. However, buyers need to be very diligent in evaluating “bargain” houses, as any potential issues such as elevation, etc. would be theirs to face. Non-compliant homes are especially problematic, because even a cash buyer could not purchase and renovate them, and simply choose not to have flood insurance. Parishes will not issue a building permit for the repairs on a non-compliant structure, so they’d still have to elevate if the house is below BFE.

The prospect of abandoned homes is something else to consider for those thinking about picking up flooded houses cheap. Suppose that the newly renovated property is surrounded by empty, gutted houses? It won’t have much appeal, and could turn out to be a bad investment. Nobody wants to live in the middle of abandoned homes or vacant lots.

We believe that there will be new activity among even the badly flooded homes. People have a way of bouncing back strongly from disasters like this, and often the neighborhoods end up being better than before. However, that activity could be severely limited by the FEMA/local elevation rules. After Katrina, there were Road Home grants which helped many people without flood insurance. As of now though, nothing similar seems to be available, and thousands of people are gravely concerned.

We’re not sure what the solution is, but the prospect of losing a substantial part of the population (thus the tax base) should motivate governments into action. Hopefully those in charge recognize the gravity of the situation, and will fight for a workable solution. Ultimately, it’s the federal government (as in FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program) whose guidelines are the overriding factor, so they would have to either relax the rules, or cough up the money to help fix these houses.

If you want to know more about your specific situation, give us a call or send an email. We’ll help you in any way we can.

After the 2016 Flood: Now What?

After the 2016 Flood: Now What?

With the floodwaters gone, many are wondering what lies ahead for home sales and prices.

The devastating flood of 2016 laid waste to much of central Louisiana, on a scale not seen since Hurricane Katrina 11 years ago. More than 80% of the structures in Livingston Parish sustained flood damage, and 35% of those in East Baton Rouge. Other nearby parishes were severely affected as well.

As you may have seen in our 4-part series on flood insurance and related issues, our former home in St. Bernard Parish was completely flooded and lost to Katrina. While there are indeed differences between the flooding from Katrina and this year’s flood, there are many similarities as well. Just as in Katrina, entire neighborhoods have been devastated, and many thousands of homes have been made unlivable. As it was back then, everyone is asking with regard to houses: “Now what?”

There is no simple answer to that question, because issues such as FEMA payments, rebuilding requirements, and others remain unsettled. However, based upon our research of what happened in the years following Katrina, and our knowledge of the market, we can offer some informed analysis.

The main factor is that the supply of habitable houses is down, at least temporarily. There was already a shortage of available homes prior to the flood, and with tens of thousands damaged, that supply has now shrunk incredibly. The law of supply and demand will definitely apply, though with some limitations.

After Katrina, I saw some people raise the price of their undamaged houses ridiculously high just days after the storm, hoping to “cash in” on the sudden demand. However, since most home sales are financed, the price MUST be supported by an appraisal. This fact kept rampant price gouging to a minimum. At the same time though, there WAS a legitimate shortage of homes. Plus, buyers who had cash could afford to pay a reasonable premium to quickly get a house untouched by the hurricane. So, home prices indeed rose.

Danielle and I remain members of the New Orleans MLS, so I did some in-depth research of home prices before and after Katrina. I chose to compare homes which sold at a price of $250K or less; were in Very Good or Excellent condition; and were not foreclosures. I excluded St. Bernard Parish from the initial search, since EVERY structure in the entire parish (including our house) was declared uninhabitable after the storm.

From January 1, 2005 through August 28, 2005 (the day before Katrina) sales of homes meeting my search criteria averaged $92.59 per Square Foot of Living Area (SFLA). In this period, 4,309 such homes were sold.

I then ran the exact same search, for the same period 1 year later, in 2006. The average sales price per SFLA was $105.85. The number (volume) of sold homes increased to 4,487.

So, the average sales price per SFLA for these homes increased by 14.3% after Katrina, with the sales volume going up about 4.1%.flood2016_now_what_graph1I  went back and applied the same search criteria to St. Bernard Parish. Prior to the storm, from 1/1/2005 through 8/28/2005, there were 246 sales, averaging $82.71 per SFLA.

Due to the utter devastation in the parish, it took a long time for rebuilding to begin, so only 7 (SEVEN) houses meeting my criteria were sold there in all of 2006! I therefore extended the post-Katrina comparison period through the end of 2007. During this time, 131 such homes sold, at an average price per SFLA of $92.28.

While the number of sales fell by 46.7%, the average price of those sales was 11.6% higher! It makes sense that the volume was down, since literally EVERY house had been damaged. It also stands to reason that prices went up, due to the low number of available homes. It is encouraging that even homes in an area which was completely destroyed, all of which had to be repaired, still sold on average for 11.6% more than before the storm.flood2016_now_what_graph2

In my opinion, our part of the state after the 2016 flood is a lot like New Orleans and its surroundings were after Katrina. Some areas were completely flooded, while others were untouched, and yet others fell somewhere in between. I think we will see a similar trend in prices, with non-flooded homes, and later, homes which flooded once and were well-repaired, increasing in price somewhere in the 10%-15% range. This estimate will NOT apply to homes which were heavily damaged and/or lie below Base Flood Elevation (BFE). Those will not fare so well, unfortunately.

The road back to full recovery from this disaster will be long and difficult. If you’d like to ask our opinion on your specific situation, we’ll be glad to do so. Just give us a call or send an email.

In my next article, I’ll talk about some of the issues, challenges, and opportunities you can expect with regard to real estate in the coming months.

Before and After

A House Reborn

One of the nicest things about real estate is seeing someone take an old house and give it new life with quality renovations, and a lot of love.

We recently had the pleasure of helping a client find an old house in a high demand area. Their list of needs and wants was detailed, and it took quite a while for the right property to come along. When it did however, we acted quickly, and though there were obstacles along the way, we got it closed.

The property was approximately 100 years old, and had decades of deferred maintenance. Wood rot, foundation issues, termites, problems with AC, plumbing, and electrical systems – these were all on the list of known defects. In spite of this, the house was very special, and provided our buyer exactly what they’d been looking for. At the same time, they had no illusions about the amount of work needed, or the cost.termiteAlmost immediately after closing, the contractor whom they had carefully chosen got to work. As they tore into the home, they discovered that the termite damage was even worse than expected, though it was not a complete surprise. Fully half of the framing had to be replaced. They completely gutted the interior, changing the floorplan to one which was more useful, spacious, and modern. Outside, 100% of the old wood siding was discarded, and the house re-covered with HardiePlank cement fiber siding. Windows were added, as were completely new AC units, knotty pine flooring, and much more. It was a complete remodel in the truest sense of the word.We got to visit the home recently when it was just about complete. Only a few cosmetic items were left to do. We were stunned by how beautiful it is. After having been in the house at the very start, seeing it renovated was almost like being in a different home. Yet, the charm and character of the house remain. The new owners put a lot of thought, care, and tasteful creativity into the renovations. What was an old, badly neglected home has been transformed into a showpiece.

Renovating a home in this manner is a huge plus for the owners, the neighbors, and the surrounding community as a whole. The appeal and value of the house are astronomically higher now, and this all carries over into elevating neighborhood property values and  appearance. Everyone benefits from such a transformation. It gave us a great feeling knowing that we’d played a part in making this possible. We can’t wait for the next one!